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Estate Planning for Young Families


Many young families put off estate planning because they are young and healthy, or because they don't think they can afford it. But even a healthy, young adult can be taken suddenly by an accident or illness. And while none of us expects to die while our family is young, planning for the possibility is prudent and responsible. Also, estate planning does not have to be expensive; a young family can start with the essential legal documents and term life insurance, then update and upgrade as their financial situation improves. A good estate plan for a young family will include the following: Naming an Administrator This person will be responsible for handling final financial affairs--locating and valuing assets, locating and paying bills, distributing assets, and hiring an attorney and other advisors. It should be someone who is trustworthy, willing and able to take on the responsibility. Naming a Guardian for Minor Children Deciding who will raise the children if something happens to both parents is often a difficult decision. But it is very important, because if the parents do not name a guardian, the court will have to appoint someone without knowing their wishes, the children or other family members. Providing Instructions for Distribution of Assets Most married couples want their assets to go to the surviving spouse if one of them dies. If both parents die and the children are young, they want their assets to be used to care for their children. Some assets will transfer automatically to the surviving spouse by beneficiary designations and how title is held. However, an estate plan is still needed in the event this spouse becomes disabled or dies, so that the assets can be used to provide for the children. Naming Someone to Manage the Children's Inheritance Unless this in included in the estate plan, the court will appoint someone to oversee the children's inheritance. This will likely be a friend of the judge and a stranger to the family. It will cost money (paid from the inheritance) and the children will receive their inheritances in equal shares when they reach legal age, usually age 18. Most parents prefer that their children inherit when they are older, and to keep the money in one 'pot' so it can be used to provide for the children's different needs. Establishing a trust for the children's inheritance lets the parents accomplish these goals and select someone they know and trust to manage it. Reviewing Insurance Needs Income earned by one or both parents would need to be replaced, and someone may need to be hired to take over the responsibilities of a stay-at-home parent. Additional coverage may be needed to provide for the children until they are grown; even more if the parents want to pay for college. Planning for Disability There is the possibility that one or both parents could become disabled due to injury, illness or even a random act of violence. Both parents need medical powers of attorney that give someone legal authority to make health care decisions if they are unable to do so for themselves. (You would probably name your spouse to do this, but one or two others should be named in case your spouse is also unable to act.) HIPPA authorizations will give doctors permission to discuss your medical situation with others (parents, siblings and close friends). Disability income insurance should also be considered, because life insurance does not pay at disability.

About the Company:

Heritage Law Group, PLLC is a boutique Estate Planning and Elder Law firm assisting residents in Tennessee and Kentucky. We are dedicated to providing client-centered, professional legal services that are individualized through one-on-one consultations. We delight in empowering our clients and community through education and providing specialized resources. Our integrity-driven team will help you protect your legacy while delivering outstanding quality at a reasonable cost.

Owner, Jake Mason, J.D., LL.M. (Elder Law & Estate Planning), EPLS, is board-certified in Estate Planning and Probate, accredited by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs, and licensed in Kentucky and Tennessee. Contact us to schedule a consultation at (615) 989-7054 or info@planyourlegacy.com.

Your Legacy Is Our Priority™

Heritage Law Group, PLLC

1526 Hunt Club Boulevard, Suite 550

Gallatin, Tennessee 37066

Phone: (615) 989-7054

Fax: (615) 751-5208

info@planyourlegacy.com

Monday-Friday, 8:00AM-4:30PM

Visiting this site does not create an attorney-client relationship with Heritage Law Group, PLLC. Tennessee law requires notification that this is an advertisement and this website is not intended to provide legal advice. If you are seeking legal advice, you must seek it by speaking directly to a licensed attorney. While our firm welcomes feedback, we cannot accept a new legal matter without making sure there is no conflict of interest with other client matters in which we are already involved and there is no other conflict of interest that might prevent us from representing you. Unless otherwise noted, all Heritage Law Group, PLLC attorneys are generally licensed to practice law in the State of Tennessee. Attorney Jacob Mason is also licensed to practice law in the State of Kentucky. Every situation is unique and you should not act on information contained in this website without seeking advice from a legal professional specific to your particular situation. 

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